Amanda Ripley (Senior Fellow, Emerson Collective): What America Can Learn About Smart Schools in Other Countries (New York Times)

by Tommy Cornelis


Every three years, half a million 15-year-olds in 69 countries take a two-hour test designed to gauge their ability to think. Unlike other exams, the PISA, as it is known, does not assess what teenagers have memorized. Instead, it asks them to solve problems they haven’t seen before, to identify patterns that are not obvious and to make compelling written arguments. It tests the skills, in other words, that machines have not yet mastered.





$1.6 million grant to improve Kettle Falls STEM classrooms (Statesman-Examiner)

by Tommy Cornelis


$1.6 million grant to improve Kettle Falls STEM classrooms (Statesman-Examiner) The Kettle Falls School District is in the process of a STEM classroom renovation project, made possible by a $1.6 million grant. Washington STEM is a statewide nonprofit that advances science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. In partnership with Washington’s Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), Washington STEM …


IBM’s Watson Now Fights Cybercrime in the Real World (WIRED)

by Tommy Cornelis


IBM’s Watson Now Fights Cybercrime in the Real World (WIRED) You may know Watson as IBM’s Jeopardy-winning, cookbook-writing, dress-designing, weather-predictingsupercomputer-of-all trades. Now it’s embarking on its biggest challenge yet: Preventing cybercrime in finance, healthcare, and other fields. Starting today, 40 organizations will rely upon the clever computers cognitive power to help spot cybercrime. The Watson for Cybersecurity beta program helps IBM too, because Watson’s real-world experience …


Fears and questions over Brexit’s impact on talent (TechCrunch)

by Tommy Cornelis


While UK tech founders continue to try to second guess what ‘Brexit means Brexit’ actually means for the future of immigration and access to talent, the UK’s digital minister, Matt Hancock, has confirmed it will not mean a clone of the Australian points-based immigration system – despite politicians frequently citing this system as a possible model for the UK to adopt during the Brexit campaign.



The best part of Fantastic Beasts is that it’s about science (ars technica)

by Tommy Cornelis


The animals in Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them are so compelling that it’s easy to ignore the movie’s otherwise mediocre plot. That’s because the magizoologist character Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) is a science hero who has somehow found himself in a fantasy movie. Sure, he’s a wizard who carries a massive lab around with him in a cunning suitcase that’s a lot bigger on the inside. But despite all the spell-casting, this Harry Potter prequel offers some of the most realistic representations of environmental research field work you’re likely to see in a movie this decade.


Scientists and environmentalists are bracing for a clash with Trump (Washington Post)

by Tommy Cornelis


Scientists and environmentalists are bracing for a clash with Trump Since the election of Donald Trump, few groups have mobilized more quickly to try to influence his future decisions and appointments than scientists and environmentalists, constituencies that fear they could be marginalized once he takes the helm of the federal government in January. Petitions and open letters have poured out …



How coding could be the next Spanish class in Florida high schools (Tampa Bay Business Journal)

by brian jackson


Florida high school students could soon ditch Spanish class in favor of computer coding. State Sen. Jeff Brandes (R-St. Petersburg) filed a bill Monday that would allow students to take two computer coding classes in lieu of foreign language requirements currently in place. “If you ask companies whether they’d rather have someone fluent in coding or in Latin, they’ll answer coding,” Brandes said. Senate Bill 104 would also require all Florida public universities to honor the coding credits as foreign language requirements. It allows Florida high schools to offer coding courses as a foreign language, but does not require them to.




IHS students use 3-D printer to learn building blocks of geometry (The Mining Journal)

by brian jackson


Ishpeming High School students are combining geometry, technology and construction experience as a fun and useful way to apply basic math skills. Geometry in Construction students are using a 3-D printer that Heather Salmi built as a part of the U.P. Project SMILE grant. Project SMILE, which stands for Science & Mathematics Integrated with Literacy through Engineering, is the product of a Math Science Partnership grant from the Michigan Department of Education that the Seaborg Center at Northern Michigan University can apply for. Salmi said the printer seemed like a logical addition to the geometry and construction curricula.


Ohio State engineers give toys a unique second life (Big Ten Network)

by brian jackson


TAP’s mission is twofold: to offer hands-on education to OSU’s engineering students while providing modified electronic toys to children who fall within a spectrum of different abilities. This combination of experiential learning while tackling a social need has been a win-win for both the students and young children.





JD Hoye (President, National Academy Foundation (NAF)): Celebrating Computer Science Education Week 2016:Investing in Computer Science for All Will Be Key to College and Career Readiness (Huffington Post)

by brian jackson


The first week of December has been designated Computer Science Education Week. Created by the Computing in the Core coalition, the week is geared towards activities that encourage students to learn more about computer science. NAF is proud to join in the celebration and support this outstanding program that makes the benefits of computer science education accessible across the K-12 spectrum.